Very Light Bows

  

Recently I have seen an influx of bows come through the shop that have heavy price tags and very light weights. Interestingly these have been predominantly cello bows purported to be by old French makers – although I’ve seen at least one 19th Century English bow.

These bows are being sold for multiple tens of thousands of dollars and the heaviest bow was 75 grams, the lightest, 72grams. Let us remember that the industry standard for cello bows is 78-82 grams, for viola bows, 68-72 grams. The bows were in the proper balance range, so adding more overall weight without seriously affecting playability would be nearly impossible without using extraordinary measures like the addition of lead plugs. 

So why is this a concern? In previous posts I have pointed out that many dealers are overly obsessed with reaching an “ideal” weight with bows (usually in the middle of the accepted range) over considerations of correct balance. I also stated my belief that bows that are above and below the accepted weight ranges can be great sticks if one keeps an open mind. So here we have very light bows that are correctly balanced, are very pricy and by famous makers. The concern from a functional standpoint with an exceedingly light bow is that it will feel unstable, want to fly away and won’t have adequate weight to want to stay on/in the string. On the positive side a light bow can be more agile, may have smoother bow changes, and be more resonant. So a light bow can be good or bad. Many fine musicians I know lean towards lighter more flexible sticks.

My main worry with these cello bows is the price tag based on advertised provenance combined with the unusually light weight. I mean, a 72 gram cello bow is basically a short, tall viola bow, even if it is stamped, “A. Lamy à Paris”. At some point unusually light (or heavy) weight must affect price. Sure, a dealer might tell you, “Look, this bow was made by a famous maker so therefore the price must be in this range even though it’s slightly light”. One worry is that the tune of dealers may change when one who has purchased such a light bow goes to sell it. This concern of mine is due to the obsession with provenance over function that exists in the violin business. Often times bows with elite provenance will be priced higher despite serious functional deficits, however when a dealer is purchasing or taking a bow in on consignment the story will change and the message to the the seller or owner will be “Look, this bow has a lot of problems,I can only charge so much,” making room for greater profit on behalf of the shop owner.

If you love light bows and want to buy one, by all means, go ahead and get one, just think twice about how much you are willing to spend. Resist “investing” in an expensive bow that has variables too far from the mainstream. The problem is when bows by “fancy” makers which have serious issues cross paths with dealers pushing the investment angle, creating high pricing. In the world of fine violins, there can be a tremendous difference in prices by a single maker. You can buy a two million dollar Strad or a 16 million dollar Strad, due to a whole host of reasons including condition and modeling. However, there seems to be a smaller price range available for those seeking to buy fine bows, the only exception being bows that have had their heads broken in half, been repaired, and had original frogs and buttons removed and replaced. Even with damaged, partially original bows such as these I have seen exorbitant pricing.

So if you are determined to buy a light bow by a historical maker that is a safe investment (as far as amateur investment can be considered safe), or at least hold its value over time, please consider the following guidelines:

1) Be as confident as you can about attribution – think about what kind of verification and history the bow comes with.

2) Check that the bow is as close to the industry accepted lower end of the weight range (78 grams for cello bows) as possible, is original in all its parts and free from serious defects.

3) Buy from a reputable shop that will stand behind the sale, will take the bow in on trade at its original price and will actually still be in business in future when you are ready to sell or trade.

4) Be sure the bow is offered at a fair price. Do your research.  Get a second opinion. 

5)  Make sure you really love the way the bow plays.  

6) Fully insure your new bow once purchased.

In a future post, I will delve more deeply into issues of commodification, speculation and concepts of investment with respect to the violin business. Overall I would caution players against speculation on instruments for profit and advise them to purchase bows based primarily on playability and value.

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2 thoughts on “Very Light Bows

  1. Very good article Erick, thank you.
    As a follow up maybe you could consider touching on the subject of nickel mounted bows by famous French makers, as I have recently bought from Tarisio a J.J.Martin violin bow 61.3 gr, Vuillaume frog and perfectly balanced. It is my overall go to bow and I do have a fantastic Sartory and a Viorin.
    As I understand bow making in France was not a very profitable occupation, unless you were D. Peccatte or Tourte. For the rest of them poverty was the norm and as such a lot of them could not afford expensive gold or silver mounts. As they needed to work, they would produce fantastic nickel mounted bows for the trade, but nevrtheless excellent players.

    • There are records showing that even the most famous French makers in the 19th century were filling orders from Parisian shops for bows of every level, including nickel mounted sticks and sticks of lesser grade woods.

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